So, I randomly decided to try my hand at sprouted grain flour. I went to the bulk bins at Winco and see what I could find. They didn’t really have as many whole grains as I wanted, so I bought some barley, red Winter wheat, white wheat, and some raw sunflower seeds. I am going to say this right now: do not try to sprout shelled raw sunflower seeds! They got slimy, stinky, and NEVER really dried out.

In a quart jar, I put one cup of each, put my sprouting lids on the jars, rinsed, then filled them with water and let them soak overnight. I then drained out the liquid, rinsed them, and stored them upside down. Rinse and drain twice per day until the grains are sprouted as much as you want them to be.

Here are the sprouting lids I am using:

[UPGRADED] Aozita 6 Pack Plastic Sprouting Lids for Wide Mouth Mason Jars – Sprouting Jar Strainer Lid for Canning Jars – Sprouting Screen for Broccoli, Alfalfa, etc. by Aozita

Then, to dry them, I put parchment paper onto rimmed baking sheets, spread the grains out, and put these baking sheets in the over with only the light on. That produced enough heat to ensure the air was warm and dry enough to dehydrate the grains. Then, for about 48 hours, I stirred the grains around. The ones toward the outside of the baking sheets dry faster. Once they were completely dry, I put them in jars.

I tried to grind them into flour with my food processor first but all the grains did was spin around, so I tried my blender. That did a pretty good job! I first pulsed the grains on the “crush ice” setting, then just blended them on the lowest setting for 5 minutes. I had to strain it because the blender didn’t grind all of the grains and I didn’t want it chunky. It was at this point that I killed my blender. I ran it for 10 minutes and it overheated so bad that it wouldn’t start again.

I went looking on Amazon and almost bought these:

Roots & Branches VKP1024 Deluxe Grain Mill, small, Silver by Amazon.com

Roots & Branches VKP1024-M2 Deluxe VKP1024 grain mill motor, small, black by BuyBoxer

BUT I ended up buying this one:

NutriMill Plus High-Speed Grain/Flour Mill by Nutrimill

I love this mill! I am so happy I went with this instead of a hand crank mill because I know how strenuous it can be to use my hand meat grinder. I can’t imagine how much more tiring it would be using a hand operated grain mill! I ran the grain through twice and BAM! I had really nice flour!

If you make too much flour, just store it in an air-tight container (if you won’t be using it again for a while, store it in the freezer). That’s it! We made flour! My next video is how to turn this into bread. 🙂

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